Skip to main content Skip to main navigation menu Skip to site footer

Te Pua Keith Park – Nau mai, Haere mai Let’s Play Together

Abstract

Te Pua/Keith Park playground employed an innovative early program of co-design with an All Abilities Project Group (AAPG), representing disability organisations and key stakeholders from the community. Through ongoing engagement with disabled people as experts, the outcome was an inclusive and welcoming play space for a diverse range of children, young people and their caregivers.
Play equipment included a range of vestibular, visual, and auditory pieces as well as a customised 2m high wheelchair accessible play tower for inclusive play experiences. Caregivers were enabled to play with their children through smooth and step-free surfaces as well as specific play equipment such as an adult and child swing. Children and young people of different ages and abilities were encouraged to sit/lie/stand in the basket swing and see-saw together. Unique to this playground, communication boards were innovatively and collaboratively designed with visual images representing various features of the playground and QR codes linking to online videos with New Zealand Sign Language.
In addition to play equipment, the AAPG identified that the toilet facilities were crucial to ensuring accessibility to many families, including those with bigger children or teens with access needs who were often faced with the reality of needing to be changed in unsanitary and unsafe ways without the appropriate facilities being available. Keith Park worked with a leading toilet manufacturer to co-design a bespoke double toilet block with enhanced accessibility features including an adult-sized change table.
Every aspect of the park was carefully selected and designed including fencing, furniture, plants and colours. Colour enhanced accessibility by guiding children with low vision and created a play circuit to assist the neurodiverse community. The resultant playground is one that welcomes all to play, which is a core tenet of child development, socialisation and participation.

 

Read the full article in accessible html-format here.

Published:
Pages:155 to 182
Section: Non Academic / Case study
How to Cite
Copeland, E., Stringer, J., Naylor, V. and Rim Lee, S. (2022) “Te Pua Keith Park – Nau mai, Haere mai Let’s Play Together”, The Journal of Public Space, 7(2), pp. 155-182. doi: https://doi.org/10.32891/jps.v7i2.1517.

Author Biographies

Auckland Council
New Zealand New Zealand

Elise Copeland is Principal Specialist Universal Design at Auckland Council in New Zealanda. She provides  specialist advice and education in Universal Design across Auckland Council and Council Controlled Organisations. She is part of the Council Projects Design Review Panel, working on major public realm and transport upgrades across the Auckland Region. She is leading the Universal Design Forum and and she serves as Deputy Lead Officer for Council’s Disability Advisory Panel. Member of Auckland Transport’s Capital Project Accessibility Group and Public Transport Accessibility Group. She writes and curates content for the Universal Design Hub of the Auckland Design Manual. She has taught at the Auckland University of Technology across the undergraduate occupational therapy programme including Enabling Systems Change and Promoting Occupational Justice and Participation.

Auckland Council
New Zealand New Zealand

Project Manager of Te Pua Keith Park Playground.

CCS Disability Action
New Zealand New Zealand

Barrier Free Advisor & Educator at CCS Disability Action, Auckland, New Zealand.

Auckland Council
New Zealand New Zealand

A motivated and adaptable graduate with a Masters of Architecture and Urban Planning degree with a particular interest in the resilience of the built environment. This gave me an opportunity to work with the universal design team at Auckland Council, who are passionate in creating a built environment for everyone to avoid reconstruction and obsoletion. It aligned closely with my interests and assisting with the article has been a great learning experience for me.

References

Auckland Council Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau (2017) Auckland Tākaro - Investing in Play discussion document. Available at: https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2017/05/ENV_20170516_AGN_6828_AT_files/ENV_20170516_AGN_6828_AT_Attachment_51841_1.PDF

Auckland Council Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau (2022) He Kōrero mō ngā poari ā-rohe About local boards. [Online]. Available at: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/Pages/about-local-boards.aspx

Auckland for kids. (2020) Keith park all abilities playground, Weymouth. [Online]. Available at: https://www.aucklandforkids.co.nz/playgrounds/keith-park-all-abilities-playground-weymouth/

Bundy, A.C. (1997) Play and playfulness: What to look for. In L. D. Parham & L. S. Fazio (Eds.), Play in occupational therapy for children (pp. 52-66). St. Louis, MO: Mosby-Year Book Inc.

Changing Places NZ. (2021) Where should Changing Places be located? [Online]. Available at: https://www.changingplaces.org.nz/about/Where-needed.htm

Disability Figures NZ. (2013) Impairment rates in NZ children. [Online]. Available at: https://figure.nz/chart/tHkfv76aQ1oI48LN

Doyle, K. (2022) Calls for universal accessibility design for Auckland public playgrounds. Radio New Zealand. [Online]. Available at: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/459810/calls-for-universal-accessibility-design-for-auckland-public-playgrounds

Fernelius, C.L. & Christensen, K.M. (2017) Systematic review of evidence-based practices for inclusive playground design. Children, Youth & Environments, 27(3), 78-102. Available at: https://doi.org/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.27.3.0078

Goltsman, S. (2011) Outdoor play settings: An inclusive approach. In Preiser, W. & Smith, K. Universal Design Handbook. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc: USA.

Hay, Rowena, Samuel, Flora, Watson, Kelly J, & Bradbury, Simon. (2018). Post-occupancy evaluation in architecture: Experiences and perspectives from UK practice. Building Research and Information: The International Journal of Research, Development and Demonstration, 46(6), 698-710. Available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09613218.2017.1314692

Kimberly, G. (2021) Keith Park All Abilities Playground, Weymouth, South Auckland. [Online]. Available at: https://grabyourwheels.nz/2021/12/10/keith-park-all-abilities-playground-weymouth-south-auckland/

Kompan. (n.d.) Equality in play. [Online]. Available at: https://www.kompan.com/inclusive-play

Kompan. (2013) Play for All: The newest developments in universal design, accessibility and inclusion in playgrounds. [Online]. Available at: https://www.playgrounds.co.nz/media/1573/play-for-all-kompan-inclusive-play-guide.pdf

Kompan. (2020) Play for all: Universal design for inclusive playgrounds. [Online]. Available at: https://www.playgrounds.co.nz/media/36445/play-for-all-universal-designs-for-inclusive-playgrounds.pdf

Kompan Playgrounds helps City of Albany improve opportunity for health and wellness for all residents. (2020, February 6). PR Newswire, NA. Available at: https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A613293637/AONE?u=learn&sid=bookmark-AONE&xid=bc0c8eaf

Lynch, H., Moore, A., Edwards, C., & Horgan, L. (2020) Advancing play participation for all: The challenge of addressing play diversity and inclusion in community parks and playgrounds. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 83(2), 107-117. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022619881936

Lynch. H. & Moore, A. (2016) Play as an occupation in occupational therapy. British Journal of Occupational Therapy 79(9), 519-520. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022616664540

Manurewa Local Board (2020). Manurewa Local Board Plan Te Mahere ā-rohe o Manurewa 2020 [Online]. Available at: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/manurewa-local-board/Documents/manurewa-local-board-plan-2020-english.pdf

Moore, A., Lynch, H., & Boyle, B. (2020) Can universal design support outdoor play, social participation, and inclusion in public playgrounds? A scoping review. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-22. [Online]. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2020.1858353

Our Auckland Tō Tātou Tāmaki Makaurau (2020). Manurewa’s Keith Park caters for all abilities: Families help design new play space. [Online] Available at: https://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/news/2020/02/manurewa-s-keith-park-caters-for-all-abilities/

Our Auckland Tō Tātou Tāmaki Makaurau (2021) Sign of growing pride in Manurewa’s Māori identity. [Online]. Available at: https://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/news/2021/05/sign-of-growing-pride-in-manurewa-s-maori-identity/

Prellwits, M. & Skär, L. (2007) Usability of playgrounds for children with different abilities. Occupational Therapy International, 14(3), 144-155. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1002/oti.230

Recreation Aotearoa Te Whai Oranga. (2020) 2020 New Zealand Parks Awards. [Online]. Available at: https://www.nzrecreation.org.nz/Site/news/all/2020-parks-awards.aspx

Stats NZ Tatauranga Aotearoa. (2014) Disability Survey: 2013. Available at: https://www.stats.govt.nz/information-releases/disability-survey-2013

Steinfeld, E., & Danford, G. Scott. (1999) Enabling environments: Measuring the impact of environment on disability and rehabilitation (Plenum series in rehabilitation and health). Springer Science + Business Media: New York, NY.

Steinfeld, E. & Maisel, J & Levine, D. (2012) Universal design: Creating inclusive environments. John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ.

Wilson, L. (2015) Senior playgrounds and universal design. [Online]. Available at: https://sourceable.net/senior-playgrounds-and-universal-design/
Open Access Journal
ISSN 2206-9658